Tag Archives: style

Warm up with fall fashions

29 Sep

Spring and summer fashions focused on athletic styles, crop tops and artsy prints. And while we do see some overlap in the trends transitioning into fall, this season is all about the mod vibe, cozy textures, bold graphic prints and colour combinations. With trends ranging from low-key, casual knits to dramatic patterned dresses, the fall and winter season has something to suit every style.

One of the biggest trends to hit fall collections is the 60s look. Gucci channelled the swinging 60s vibe with structured, collarless pea coats. Over at Dsquared, 60s glamour and shorter hemlines owned the runway as the designers displayed fur trimmed shift minidresses and blue python microminis. Youthful shift dresses at Saint Laurent paid homage to London’s 1960s mod and music scene. Characterized by A-line coats and short hemlines, complete the retro 60s silhouette with mock turtlenecks and knee-high boots.

60s mod revived at Dsquared.

Sixties mod revived at Dsquared.

In terms of fabrics for this season, the cozier the better. Befitting the colder weather, knitwear is a huge trend for fall and winter this year. And the main idea is to go big or go home. Overexaggerated sweaters and head-to-toe knit ensembles were spotted at Celine and Marc Jacobs. Michael Kors, meanwhile, paired their luxuriously long cardigans with chunky knit scarves. And the normally glamorous Lanvin added some casual elegance to his collection with ruffled-hem sweater dresses. Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen’s fashion line The Row, in particular, took knitwear to another level with a look consisting of an extremely oversized cowl-neck cashmere sweater and matching knit skirt. For the fashion forward, rock the sweater trend with knit pants this season.

Cozy up with knit on knit fashions as seen at Celine.

Cozy up with knit on knit fashions as seen at Celine.

Shearling is another huge texture trend for this season. The plush fur, faux or real, can add a sophisticated touch to any outfit. The easiest way to incorporate shearling is through a coat or vest like at Isabel Marant. Whether lined with the fur or just small trim details like at Oscar de la Renta, the textile creates a luxe Aspen vibe. Prada and 3.1 Phillip Lim both showcased colour-blocked, patchwork shearling coats, Marni mixed the fur with metallic.

Perhaps it’s to offset the grey skies coming our way this seasons, but in terms of colour trends, designers opted for vibrant shades in their fall/winter collections. The “It” piece that had fashion audiences reaching for their camera apps was Joseph Altuzarra’s bright pink and grey wrap coat. The hot pink provided a striking contrast to the otherwise muted robe coat. Dior also created a showstopper with their bright pink and green dress combination. Reviving the colour-blocking trend from previous seasons, Prabal Gurung used a more traditionally warm autumn colour palette such as auburn, orange and reds and paired them with greys and black.

Bright psychedelic prints at Dries Van Noten.

Bright psychedelic prints at Dries Van Noten.

Eye-catching prints are also hot for fall. Marc by Marc Jacobs showed graphic prints and patterns fit for a tough biker chick. Kenzo embraced dark surrealism using embroidery and printed fabrics while Proenza Schouler created a cool effect with multi-layered prints and 3-D textures. Even Chanel incorporated funky geometric patterns onto their coats and dresses. A mix of rave culture, optical illusion and art exhibit, the print trend this season is not for the fashion shy. Ease into the trend using graphic print accessories such as bags, shoes or caps and keep the rest of the ensemble relatively simple. Sometimes one statement piece is all you need to make your outfit stand out.

Fall is always a great time to experiment with personal style since we can layer items we already love with new trendy pieces. So explore this season’s trends and have fun with fashion!

[Article first appeared in the Sept. 10 issue of Richmond Review.]

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Encore fashion: Shopping vintage

14 Sep

Experiencing the thrill of the hunt combined with acquiring unique pieces, vintage shopping can be a fashion lover’s dream. It’s also an eco-friendly way to shop since merchandise is recycled from previous owners. And with the popularity of shows like Mad Men and Downton Abbey, vintage shopping and historic clothing have seen a renewed interest from trendy audiences and savvy shoppers. So if you’re tired of seeing someone else wearing the same outfit you bought at a chain store, give consignment, thrift or vintage stores a try. Since previous eras valued handmade details and durability, a truly vintage high-end piece will tend to have better quality than something more contemporary.

Early 1920s costumes on Downton Abbey.

Early 1920s costumes on Downton Abbey.

In terms of secondhand shops, consignment stores are where the profit is split between the shop and the person who brought in the clothes to be sold. This differs from thrift stores where merchandise is donated and the profits go back towards the store or a charity. Consignment shops are typically where one would find higher-end labels since they’re picky about what items will sell. Vintage stores, on the other hand, usually sell merchandise with a sense of history and cultural significance — the clothes are timeless and reflect a specific fashion era.

When shopping at secondhand stores it’s important to keep in mind the condition of the item, quality of the piece and whether it can be worn as a classic staple or as a trend for the season. And when it comes to higher-end brands, verifying its authenticity is essential. It’s difficult to shop consignment or thrift with a specific item to look for, so always try to go in with an open mind.

Channel Mad Men with vintage nipped waist dresses.

Channel Mad Men with vintage nipped waist dresses.

Keep your eyes peeled for pieces that will fit well into your existing wardrobe and that can be easily tailored to fit. If an item doesn’t complement your personal style, it’ll run the risk of looking like a costume. A good way to start secondhand shopping would be to look for classic pieces with clean lines, quality materials and simple designs. Know what era works for you in terms of fit and style preference. Whether you’re more drawn towards the 1920s flapper period, 60s mod or 70s hippie look, you’ll get more mileage out of the purchase by ensuring the piece is wearable and fits in with your sense of style.

Your sizing may vary when shopping at secondhand stores. Sizing measurements can change over time and between different brands. So if an item catches your eye, try it on regardless of the number on the label. Tailoring can also be a very important part of the vintage shopping process. The right tailoring can turn a vintage frock from oversized and frumpy to looking like something high-end and custom made. However, not every piece can be altered, so take into consideration the fabric and structure of the garment. Cinching baggier tops or dresses with a belt can also do wonders to define the waist for a more flattering fit.

Mix a vintage blouse into your modern wardrobe.

Mix a vintage blouse into your modern wardrobe.

But before you head to the register, double check the item’s condition carefully. Look for any damage, stains, fading, missing details or loose embellishments. A quick way to check for areas of excessive wear is to hold the clothing up to the light.

There are tons of great vintage and consignment shops in Richmond, particular in the Steveston area. So take your time and browse with an open mind for pieces with potential. Items are one of a kind when shopping secondhand, so if a piece speaks to you, grab it before it’s gone!

[Article first appeared in the August 13 issue of Richmond Review.]

Stylish Halloween costumes

17 Oct

There’s only two more weeks left until Halloween, so if you’re a huge fan of the annual celebration chances are you already have your costume picked out and ready to go. But for those of us who are still unsure about what to dress up as, or decide last minute to head to a costume party, here are some stylish ideas that are easy to pull together from pieces that may be available in your wardrobe. For something you’ll only wear once, it’s simpler to avoid spending a fortune and just create a costume from items you already have. Halloween is a great way to express your interest in fashion by emulating chic characters from film and television, or even popular fashion designers.

January Jones as Betty in Mad Men.

January Jones as Betty in Mad Men.

Breaking Bad’s yellow hazmat suits will be popular this Halloween, but for a more stylish costume option dress up as one of the characters from AMC’s other critically acclaimed show, Mad Men. Whether you want to go as Betty, Joan, Peggy or Megan the key is to find a tailored outfit that looks inspired from the 1960s. For Betty, go for silhouettes with nipped waists and full skirts. Try printed silk blouses, petticoats, shirtwaist dresses and swing coats. Complete the perfectly polished Betty look with an elegant hairdo and red lipstick. To dress like Joan, wear a figure-hugging dress in a vibrant jewel-toned colour, or a sweater and pencil skirt set. Peggy’s working look went through many changes over the seasons, but you can’t go wrong with a 1960s inspired plaid and pleated skirt suit. As for Megan Draper, the most fashion forward on the show, a mod minidress should be the main part of the costume. Style with a dramatic winged eyeliner and a bouffant.

Carey Mulligan as Daisy in The Great Gatsby.

Carey Mulligan as Daisy in The Great Gatsby.

Another fun period costume idea is 1920s attire seen recently in The Great Gatsby and Downton Abbey. To sparkle like Daisy Buchanan don a flapper dress, characterized by drop waists, slinky straps and art deco beading. Top off a short bob hairstyle with an ornate head band. As for Downton Abbey, channel Lady Mary and Lady Edith this Halloween with ankle-grazing empire waist dresses. Accessorize with hats, gloves, pearls and beaded shrugs in luxe fabrics. For a different spin on a Downton Abbey costume dress like one of the staff, such as the head housemaid Anna. Add a white collar to a plain, long-sleeved black dress and tie a long, white lace apron overtop. Finish the look with black tights and a white headpiece for the hair.

Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary in Downton Abbey.

Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary in Downton Abbey.

For fashion designers, Karl Lagerfeld is probably the most notorious and easiest to copy. The head designer for Chanel and Fendi, Lagerfeld’s always poised in a black suit with vest over a tailored white shirt. The accessories are key for his look. Wear fingerless black leather gloves, a skinny black tie, black sunglasses, a long chain necklace, black belt and loafers. For the pièce de résistance wear a white wig pulled back into a ponytail.

Karl Lagerfeld

Karl Lagerfeld

If you’re looking for a costume that’s more timeless, reference fashionable cult classic movies such as Clueless, Annie Hall and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. To dress like Cher Horowitz or Dionne Davenport, rock a tartan suit with matching mini skirt. For an alternate look try a plaid mini skirt and a white collared shirt under a sweater vest. Top off the ensembles with knee high socks and a beret. For another fun element, you can even include the Clueless vernacular as part of your costume by inserting the phrases “Whatever!” and “As if!” into your conversations.

Besties Cher and Dionne in Clueless.

Besties Cher and Dionne in Clueless.

To get Annie Hall’s menswear inspired look that is also a huge trend for this season, add  an oversized men’s vest and a long skirt or wide-leg trousers to your look. Accessorize with a bowler hat, boots and a tie. To dress up like Holly Golightly, Audrey Hepburn’s character from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, all you need is a little black dress, chunky pearl necklace, elbow length black gloves and big sunglasses.

Diane Keaton as Annie Hall.

Diane Keaton as Annie Hall.

Halloween is the perfect occasion to test an over-the-top style you wouldn’t normally wear, so have fun with it and experiment with dressing differently!

[Article first appeared in the Oct. 16 issue of Richmond Review.]