Tag Archives: Punk

Warm up with winter accessories

16 Nov

With the end of daylight saving time everyone’s gearing up for the change in seasons. Our closets may be packed with cozy sweaters and down jackets, but winter preparation isn’t complete without cold weather shoes and accessories. Here are some ideas on incorporating accessory trends to stay stylishly warm in wet and frosty conditions.

Other than a good coat, shoes are one of the main components of dress that can determine whether you’ll be dry and toasty for the day, or drenched and freezing. Warm boots are an essential. Cute rainboots are a great pick for rainy fall days, but when the temperature drops, you’ll want something both stylish and functional. When shopping for a winter boot, you’ll want to look for enough insulation to keep your toes warm, so check the lining and insole material. Shearling wool makes for a warm and comfortable option as does thermal material such as Thinsulate.

Mid-height snow boots, such as these ones from Sorel, make for a more casual look.

Mid-height snow boots, such as these ones from Sorel, make for a more casual look.

In addition to lining material, ensure your winter boots are waterproof and have enough traction. Wet leaves and icy sidewalks can easily lead to slips, so if you feel your favourite winter boots are doing more sliding than strolling, take them into a shoe repair shop to replace the outsole. Since you want to keep in heat, opt for slim fit bottoms to tuck into your winter boots. Pairing leggings, skinny jeans or tights with your boots will create a less bulky look. For a trendy option, try combat boots. Punk and grunge are huge for this season. Rock some combat boots with tartan jeans and a leather jacket for a punk style. Or portray a grungier sensibility by wearing combat boots with an oversized cardigan, babydoll dress and black tights.

For scarves, circular versions are still a popular option, whether as an infinity scarf or a snood. Snoods are tubular neckwear that can be either worn as a scarf, or pulled over the head and lower face like a hood. Whereas infinity scarves are usually wrapped around the neck several times snoods are a simpler, yet just as stylish, alternative. Scarves are a great way to add a pop of colour to an otherwise neutral ensemble, so go for chunky knit scarf or snood in a bold hue this winter. If you want to sport one of this season’s trends try wearing a plaid scarf. Plaids, checks, tartans and houndstooth are hot patterns for fall and winter, and accessories are the perfect area to try out a trend. Don’t be afraid to mix and match patterns in your outfit — the key is to find patterned items with a similar colour palette.

Change up your scarf routine with a chunky snood.

Change up your scarf routine with a chunky snood.

Just like a colourful scarf can provide some much needed brightness to dreary grey days, the same can be said for a fun winter hat. One easy-to-wear trend is a slouchy beanie. Also known as a tuque, look for beanies that are close-fitting around the head and loose on top for a slouchy style. Flattering for most face shapes, tuques are available in a variety of material, colours and patterns. Find one that expresses your sense of style or personality so you’ll be more likely to grab it before heading out the door.

Cure the winter blahs with a fun, colourful tuque.

Cure the winter blahs with a fun, colourful tuque like this mustard version from Zara.

Gloves are another winter accessory essential. While fitted leather gloves are a timeless and elegant choice, a more practical idea may be capacitive gloves for frequent smartphone users. The capacitive threads in the fingertips will allow you to use your touchscreen devices, so now you’ll be able to change your music selection or reply a text without exposing your hands to the elements.

Dressing for the cold weather doesn’t have to mean sacrificing style. Incorporating fashionable, yet functional, winter accessories into your wardrobe will allow you to stay chic even in subzero temperatures.

[Article first appeared in the Nov. 13 issue of Richmond Review.]

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Fall fashion trends

18 Sep

It’s time to put away the scuba dresses, black and white striped pieces and anything neon. Fall fashion has arrived along with a new set of trends. For this season the theme is a play on feminine and masculine styles with a bit of androgynous punk thrown in.

For their fall show, Versace’s usual glamour was mixed with punk details.

For their fall show, Versace’s usual glamour was mixed with punk details.

Fall and winter shows coincided with the anticipation of Metropolitan Museum’s fashion exhibit, Punk: Chaos to Couture, held at the Costume Institute earlier this year. These events culminated in the alternative trend currently found in stores and as a part of street style. For fall, Rodarte showcased their punk sensibility with deconstructed dresses and oversized motorcycle jackets. Hardware details, vinyl pants and tangled layers of necklaces were spotted over at Versace. Even Chanel designed thigh-high leather boots draped with metal chains. To get the punk look, try pairing a distressed leather jacket with skinny tartan pants and combat boots. Incorporate details such as studs, chains and spikes. An additional and easy way to add a touch of punk to your ensemble is with an ear cuff. Seen at Jean Paul Gaultier and Thakoon, the ear cuff is definitely undergoing a revival.

Glitzy ear cuffs at Thakoon.

Jewelled ear cuffs sparkled down the runway at Thakoon.

Another returning 90s fashion trend is grunge, mostly due to the collection at Saint Laurent. For a grunge style, the key is to look like your outfit was assembled from thrift store finds. Flannel shirts, oversized sweaters, babydoll dresses, patterned tights, and jean jackets and vests were the essence of this subculture’s fashion.

Grunge at Saint Laurent's fall 2013 show.

Grunge at Saint Laurent’s fall 2013 show.

For silhouettes, both menswear-inspired and feminine 1940s shapes are on trend. The two were perfectly encapsulated in Dries Van Noten’s show. Slouchy, oversized contours were mixed with feathered textures and brocade pieces. The 1940s style was seen at in at a multitude of shows, such as Prada, Rochas and Lanvin. Characterized by nipped-in waists and full skirts, the refined ladylike look would fit right into Hitchcock’s film noirs. For menswear, the idea is to look like you borrowed a coat or blazer from your boyfriend’s wardrobe. Try oversized single- or double-breasted topcoats. For a more figure flattering approach, buckle a belt over the waist of the coat. Menswear-inspired style was spotted at Stella McCartney, 3.1 Phillip Lim and Chloe.

A dress at Lanvin that combines both the 1940s and pink trends.

A dress at Lanvin that combines both the 1940s and pink trends.

Another way to try out the menswear trend is through fabrics. Pinstripes, herringbone, houndstooth, tweed, argyle and Glen plaid are easy to incorporate into a fall wardrobe. Ease into it by adding a patterned piece to an otherwise neutral ensemble. For the bold, try wearing head to toe patterns. The key is to anchor the look by picking pieces from the same colour family.

A menswear-inspired look at 3.1 Phillip Lim.

A menswear-inspired look at 3.1 Phillip Lim.

Always popular for fall and winter is fur. Whether real or faux, fur pieces were all over the runways from accessories to dresses. Fendi even incorporated the texture into the models’ hair for a furry mohawk. A range of fur were seen at the fall shows, from colourful dyed fur seen at Lanvin and Versace, to classic fur stoles shown at Marc Jacobs.

For colours, both warm and cool tones ran rampant in the fall collections. Reds and pinks were popular for warmer hues while blues and greys ruled the cool shades. Even Valentino strayed from his signature red, aside from a few pieces, and focused on blue dresses. Over at Dolce & Gabbana, red gowns made a dramatic finale at their show. Cotton candy pink dresses and coats were refreshing amidst the dark ensembles at Simone Rocha. If you want to splurge on a trendy item for the fall, make it an oversized yet structured coat in a tone of red or blue. It’ll be perfect for layering over a chunky sweater.

Pink, a refreshing colour trend for fall, was the highlight of the Simone Rocha show.

Pink, a refreshing colour trend for fall, was the highlight of the Simone Rocha show.

Fall accessories also follow the masculine and feminine trend. Menswear-inspired flats such as oxford shoes and loafers are popular this season. For a girlier touch, there’s ankle-strap heels, stacked pumps and over-the-knee boots. As for bags anything goes in terms of size, from small clutches to big portfolio bags and slouchy purses.

Whether your usual style leans more towards ladylike, menswear-inspired or punk, there’s a fall trend that will complement and update your existing wardrobe. So layer up and have fun with fashion!

[Article first appeared in the Sept. 11 issue of Richmond Review.]

A look at fashion in movies

21 May

Just like the relationship between music and style, the fashion industry is also intimately linked with movies. Who could forget about Audrey Hepburn’s iconic little black Givenchy dress, accessorized with pearls, a tiara, and classic Oliver Goldsmith sunglasses in Breakfast at Tiffany’s? Or Keira Knightley’s gorgeous emerald green silk dress in Atonement that set off a multitude of copycats? Ever since 1948, fashion has been recognized at the Oscars under their Academy Award for Best Costume Design — not to mention all the red carpet outfits that get fawned over or criticized by viewers all over the world. One of the best places to take style inspiration from is film. So the next time you’re mulling in front of your closet trying to decide on an outfit, take a cue from a favourite movie character.

Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's

Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

With the recent release of Baz Luhrmann’s stylized adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, we can expect another Roaring Twenties revival in fashion. Retro looks were seen on the spring runways of Bottega Veneta, and glamorous fringed mini dresses were spotted at Versace. The flapper style previously made a comeback around the time Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris came out. Glitzy art-deco dresses paraded down the runway at Gucci’s show soon after the movie. And over at Etro in the same season, drop-waist dresses reminiscent of the jazz age were featured heavily in the collection. To incorporate the flapper look into your regular wardrobe, try pieces accented with beading or fringe, and mini dresses with straight waists. Accessorize with art-deco jewelry, embellished headbands, and layer together strands of beaded necklaces.

Flapper-inspired looks at Gucci's spring 2012 show.

Flapper-inspired looks at Gucci’s spring 2012 show.

For those looking to channel a style that’s less showy and more gothic punk, there’s the style of anti-heroine Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The movie’s release in late 2011 had a trickledown effect, making a moody impact for the fall and winter collections of 2012. Designers Proenza Schouler and Givenchy incorporated rebellious leather looks into their presentation while Fendi showed dark futuristic ensembles made of PVC and patent leather. The movie also inspired H&M to come out with a collection in collaboration with the film’s costume designer, Trish Summerville. To get the look, combine leather pieces with items such as ripped jeans, distressed tees, studded and spiked accessories, and combat boots.

Costume designer Trish Summerville with her looks for H&M's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo collection

Costume designer Trish Summerville with her looks for H&M’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo collection.

Another movie that strongly influenced the style of many, especially in the late 1970s, is Diane Keaton’s character in Woody Allen’s romantic comedy Annie Hall. Get the menswear-inspired look with oversized blazers, wide-leg trousers and flowy skirts. For the bold, complete the ensemble with a tie and bowler hat.

A movie character look that would be perfect to emulate for the warmer weather is Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday. Tuck a crisp, short sleeved button-up into a dirndl skirt and add a chic scarf around the neck for a polished touch.

Audrey Hepburn's classic outfit in Roman Holiday.

Audrey Hepburn’s classic outfit in Roman Holiday.

A popular and stylish film that made a notable impact on those who came of age in the 90s is Clueless. Bring up the movie to any young woman and, chances are, she’ll talk about how much she still wants Cher Horowitz’s revolving closet. Los Angeles company Wildfox Couture created a lookbook for spring that paid homage to Clueless. You can channel your inner Cher or Dionne with a preppy plaid mini skirt, matching blazer, and knee-high socks.

A page from the Clueless inspired lookbook by Wildfox.

A page from the Clueless inspired lookbook by Wildfox.

For every style, there’s a cinematic fashion icon. These are just a few of the movies that can provide fashion inspiration for those days when you believe there’s nothing to wear. Whether you commit fully to a look, incorporate just a few pieces from a character, or take inspiration from a combination of characters, the options are endless.

For a more casual way to incorporate your favourite movies, try a graphic tee such as this one from local designer Thinkhead.

For a more casual way to incorporate your favourite movies, try a graphic tee such as this one from local designer Thinkhead.

[Article first appeared in the May 15 issue of Richmond Review.]

Walk, walk, fashion baby: The relationship between fashion and music

8 Mar

Whether it’s models dating musicians, designers creating costumes for band tours, or even singers turned fashion designers, music and fashion are intimately linked. A lyric from one of my favourite bands, Pulp, goes “If fashion is your trade, then when you’re naked I guess you must be unemployed, yeah?” Not only is it witty but I think it also demonstrates how the idea of fashion finds its way into music content. More examples of this two-way influence can be observed throughout the past.

Blue suede shoes

As rock ‘n’ roll popularity increased in the 1950s with acts such as Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly, styles also changed to correspond with the rebellious attitude of the period.

Movie characters such as Marlon Brando in The Wild One and James Dean in Rebel Without a Cause exemplified the transformation in style. Outfits incorporating black leather, casual t-shirts and jeans became the norm for the younger generation.

Marlon Brando in The Wild One

Fashion journalist Kate Mulvey said, “For the first time, nonconformity was shown by dressing down. Rebelling against prosperous society in the 1950s meant going a step down the socio-economic ladder, and wearing working class clothes to give authenticity to what they were trying to say. Young people didn’t want to identify with the straight laced, responsible attitudes of their fathers and so dressed like a youthful version of the working man.”

Ticket to ride

As the mod subculture hit its peak in the mid 1960s, British pop music was dominating the airwaves and teenagers were spending the majority of their money on records and clothes. Young men were greatly influenced by the hairstyles and outfits of The Beatles and the women were opting for shorter hemlines. The attention to Britain extended to London fashion designer Mary Quant – the creator of the mini-skirt.

Mary Quant (right) with models in her designs

“The excitement of London life was brilliantly conveyed by the new breed of street-wise fashion photographers like David Bailey and Terrence Donovan. They were at the centre of the London scene and were up to date on fashion trends and social changes, which they captured in their distinctive fashion photographs.” – Marc Kitchen-Smith, style author.

Hippies and glam rockers

As 1969 rolled around and the Woodstock music festival took over a farm in New York, the fashions had turned to colourful patterns, vests, peasant tops and full, long skirts. Musicians such as Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix took to the stage in hippie attire. And over the pond, Italian designer Emilio Pucci reinforced the trend of vivid patterns with his own trademark geometric print.

Guitarist Jimi Hendrix

With the development of glam rock in the early 1970s, fashion took a turn for the androgynous as musicians such as Mick Jagger, Freddie Mercury and David Bowie took over the spotlight. The glam rock aesthetic mostly involved platform-soled boots, caberet-inspired styles and lots and lots of glitter and makeup.

David Bowie as his alter ego Ziggy Stardust

Clampdown

The late 1970s saw a revival of the leather jacket through the punk movement. Bands such as The Clash and The Ramones popularized trends of metal studs, Doc Martens, black leather jackets and bondage pants. Fashion designers Vivienne Westwood and Jean-Paul Gaultier also based their collections on punk culture. Former manager of the Sex Pistols, Malcolm McLaren, also capitalized on the look by opening a shop catering to punk fashions.

London punk band The Clash

“Punks were anti-fashion motivated, and strived to create their own unique outfits, avoiding mainstream trends which were considered bourgeois, over-indulgent and bland. [But] fashion designers created their own punk-inspired collections, which ultimately became mainstream fashions themselves.” – Melissa Richards, fashion historian.

Check yo self before you wreck yo self

Hip-hop hit the mainstream in the mid-1980s to mid-1990s, bringing along with it a rise in sportswear, baggy jeans, tracksuits and Timberland boots. Accessories such as heavy gold jewelry and baseball caps also corresponded with what hip-hop musicians were wearing. But I think the biggest influence hip-hop had on fashion was the through the popularity of sneakers.

A collection of kicks

“[Hip-hop musicians] even wore their trainers differently; street styled with laces undone and logoed tongues on show. All of this pushed the sports brands to further develop their styling to incorporate some of street style customizations into new products that featured fatter laces, higher tops and bolder logos.” – Emily Evans, fashion writer.

Dress up in you

As for my musical fashion icon, I’m partial to Alison Mosshart from The Kills and The Dead Weather. Her style may not be extraordinary but it mirrors my own casual outfits on days when I don’t feel like dressing up.

Alison Mosshart

Plus she’s bad-ass in this video with Jack White:

Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ bedazzled jacket from the Zero video also still stands out in my mind.

Modern girls and old fashion men

The Strokes also had a big influence on my style. They came onto the scene in 2000, dressed in ratty Converse Chuck Taylors paired with skinny jeans – a combination I would emulate throughout my university years.

The Strokes showing off their footwear

I love how they change it up for their new music video, Under Cover of Darkness. Four of the band members play their latest single in suits while lead singer Julian Casablancas hangs around in a leather jacket getup until he changes for the last third of the video.